Wednesday, 31 January 2007

by popular demand: tile photograph

Some commenters have been sighing and pining and mopping and mowing to see a picture of the tiles that I was so frightened would break my car by their sheer poundage. (I bought 18 x 26 x 7 of them, so depending on how many have escaped breakage, they're destined for the kitchen and perhaps the bathroom walls as well.)



Never say this blog doesn't give the people what they want.

The colour, I do believe, is Soylent green. Yes. This tile is....PEOPLE!

There are several dictionaries of colour names in the library: when I go there tomorrow I'm going to have to look to see what this colour is actually called. That ought to waste a good twenty minutes of taxpayer-funded vapid intellectually worthless leftist humanities department time.

While I'm on colour names, it has been a sad disappointment to me over the past few weeks to discover exactly how many instances of deplorable spelling are to be found in paint colour charts. As if I could ever paint my house a shade named "Lambarda", or "Cape Torrans", or "Gentillity", or "Burn't Sugar", ffs.

10 comments:

Bernice said...

They're not misspelt - just invented by Tiphany, Sooaanque, Brittanee, and Kilee.

Ampersand Duck said...

And paint names change every ten years or so. What used to be 'Mission Brown' in the 60s and 70s is now something like 'Melted Fudge'. I have an artist friend called Kirsten Farrell who spends a lot of time researching paint names over time. It's fascinating stuff, especially when you think of the time put into re-marketing the colour beige for each new generation.

It's almost a better job than sitting down and working out new uses for Blu-tack so that they can update the packaging, or the job of designing freaky things in Lego for the Next Big Movie tie-in. I fantasize about being paid for such tasks.

lucy tartan said...

LOL at both of you. You're dead right about the Mission Brown, Duck. Wattyl are calling it 'Cafe Noir' (how Entirely Predictable), British Paints has 'Woods Point,' Dulux has 'Pure Zeal.'

cristy said...

The colour is stunning. Now I am just waiting to see the before and after photos...

jo(e) said...

I get really distracted by all the descriptive words on paint colour charts -- I end up picking a colour out by its name, which is not really the ideal way to choose a colour.

I don't think I could ever paint anything a colour that had a really stupid name ....

lucy tartan said...

Yes, stunning is an apt description.

I wouldn't be too surprised if there were plenty of before/after photo ops ahead, with Before occupying most of the room and a tiny bit of After lurking in the corner somwhere.

Just Like A Woman said...

The green tiles are divine - I'll bet you've forgotten all about those nasty orange ones from Ebay!

From one who does work in "ahem" marketing (sadly though, not for a paint company) I can advise the
colour should obviously be called "Grass". I can only barely remember what a lush lawn looks like, but if I close my eyes and try, it looks pretty much like your lovely tiles - and what, in nature, is greener than grass?

Your land-lord should be ashamed of himself - stick to your guns, and don't relinquish your bond either.

Emily

Just Like A Woman said...

P.S.
Happy to hear Basil's coping so far - you are quite right to feel proud.

lucy tartan said...

Grass is about it - the Derwents pencil shade called Grass Green is quite close.
They also remind me of the skins of limes.

Funny how the water restrictions have really brought the reality of the drought home to us suburbanites. The city is looking very, very brown at the moment, and as a non lawn-waterer from way back, this brownness we're getting used to is how things should have looked for quite a few summers.

Anonymous said...

I am a Soylent Green fan. It's the earliest occasion I can recall when the topic of global warming was mentioned.


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